Shropshire

Private hire driver found guilty after failing to take assistance dog in vehicle

BBC Shropshire News Feed - Fri, 05/17/2019 - 15:52

Following a trial at Telford Magistrates’ Court on Monday 13 May 2019, a private hire driver was found guilty of an offence under the Equality Act 2010 for refusing to take an assistance dog on a pre-booked journey.

The Court heard that on 3 August 2018, Mr Hilton booked a private hire vehicle to collect him and his friend Mr Kane, who is deaf and uses an assistance dog called ‘Harley’, from the Royal British Legion in Dawley. Mr Hilton gave evidence in court stating that he told the private hire company, Diamond Cars, that he and his friend were travelling with an assistance dog.

Mr Naman Yaqub, 44, from Leegomery, Telford was dispatched to the Royal British Legion, but upon seeing the assistance dog, he locked the doors to the vehicle and refused to take the fare saying “Dog, no dog”.  Mr Hilton told the driver that the dog was an assistance dog, but despite this Mr Yaqub drove off leaving the passengers without a car to take them home. Mr Hilton was forced to contact the operator and wait for a second car to be sent.

The incident was reported to Shropshire Council’s Trading Standards and Licensing Service, who investigated the matter and brought criminal proceedings against Mr Yaqub.

Under the Equality Act 2010 it is an offence for the driver of a private hire vehicle to refuse to take an assistance dog.

Mr Yaqub pleaded not guilty, stating in his defence that he did not know that the dog was an assistance dog, alleging that ‘Harley’ was not wearing a coat or lead identifying him as such, something which Mr Kane and Mr Hilton strenuously denied.

Having listened to all the evidence in the case, District Judge Cadbury said that he found Mr Hilton and Mr Kane to be truthful and reliable, and as such he was satisfied that ‘Harley’ had been wearing his harness and lead, and that Mr Yaqub had been told by Mr Hilton that he was travelling with an assistance dog.

The Judge thought that Mr Yaqub had been reluctant to accept that Harley was an assistance dog because he didn’t look like a typical guide dog for the blind, as hearing dogs do not wear harnesses with fluorescent yellow stripes but instead wear burgundy jackets.

Mr Yaqub was found guilty of the offence and sentenced to a fine of £375.00 as well as being ordered to pay a £37.50 victim surcharge and prosecution costs of £750.00.

Frances Darling, Trading Standards & Licensing Operations Manager at Shropshire Council, said:

“We welcome the outcome of this case. The Equality Act 2010 makes the position in respect of taking assistance dogs clear – whether they are guide dogs, hearing dogs or medical assistance dogs – it is a criminal offence for a private hire driver to refuse to take an assistance dog unless the driver has a medical exemption issued by the council’s licensing team. Shropshire Council takes incidents such as this extremely seriously as they affect some of the most vulnerable people in our society.”

“It’s incredibly disheartening to hear of this particular incident and that a driver licensed by Shropshire Council has clearly fallen far below what is expected of him.

“Following the successful prosecution, Mr Yaqub has been referred to Shropshire Council’s Licensing Panel where his suitability to hold a private hire drivers’ licence will be reviewed. It is reassuring that following an investigation and the legal process being followed, the court has rightly found the driver guilty.

“We will continue to ensure that taxi and private hire operators and drivers licensed by Shropshire Council comply with all legislation applicable to them. I encourage the public to report any suspected illegal activity to us; the public can be assured that any future incidents of this kind will be investigated.”

Gwilym Butler, Shropshire Council’s Cabinet member for communities, place, planning & regulatory services, said:

“Any private hire driver who refuses to take assistance dogs faces not only the prospect of legal action in the courts, but also being reported to the Council’s Licensing Panel where there is a possibility that their private hire driver’s licence will be revoked. The Equality Act 2010 provides for people with disabilities to have the same right to services as everyone else and it is against the law for service providers, such as drivers of taxis and private hire vehicles, to treat people less favourably because of their disability, including allowing guide dogs and assistance dogs into taxis and private hire vehicles with their owners”.

If you have any concerns, you should report them to the Trading Standards and Licensing Service at Shropshire Council on 0345 678 9046 or taxis@shropshire.gov.uk.

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Categories: Shropshire

Armed Forces Outreach Support at Palmer’s of Shrewsbury – Monday 20 May 2019

BBC Shropshire News Feed - Fri, 05/17/2019 - 15:15

A new Armed Forces Outreach Support service will be launched at Palmer’s of Shrewsbury next week (Monday 20 May 2019).

Armed Forces outreach support

Set to take place the first and third Monday of every month from 10am until 2pm at the café, the relaxed and friendly sessions are open to military personnel, veterans and their families.

On the day, those attending will be able to get support and advice on housing, healthcare, education, employment, finance and benefits and well-being from a range of local businesses, charities and other organisations which have shown an interest in supporting the military, or simply join in some banter.

The outreach service has made possible through the Armed Forces Covenant Grant Scheme – a scheme that gives financial support to local projects which strengthen the ties and mutual understanding between members of the Armed Forces community and the wider community in which they live.

Armed Forces Covenant Gold Award

Sean McCarthy, Shropshire Council’s sports development and Armed Forces Covenant officer, said:

“We are delighted to offer this important outreach service in Shrewsbury.

“The military community can sometimes find it difficult to access the advice they need once they leave the Armed Forces. The sessions will give serving personnel veterans and their families access to a support network which understands their background and needs – in a friendly and relaxed environment. Through this targeted advice and guidance, these people will be fully supported to lead independent lives within Shropshire.”

The outreach service has initially been supported by RBL, SSAFA, Combat Stress, Walking with the Wounded and Shropshire Council, but the service will be working closely with a number of other charities, and local organisations and businesses moving forward.

Other outreach events will also be held throughout the county. For further information, people can visit: https://www.shropshire.gov.uk/support-for-armed-forces-personnel-veterans-and-families/

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Categories: Shropshire

Surface dressing programme for summer 2019 announced

BBC Shropshire News Feed - Fri, 05/17/2019 - 11:53

Shropshire Council has announced its programme of roads that are to be surface dressed this summer. The 2019 surface dressing season is due to start in late May and continue until late July.

Surface dressing (applying and rolling aggregate ‘chippings’ onto a bituminous binder) is a proven quick, efficient and cost-effective way of maintaining skid-resistance and waterproofing road surfaces.

It forms a major part of the council’s annual road maintenance programme and – along with resurfacing – plays an important part in preventing potholes forming on the county’s roads.

Almost 40 sites – see list below – have been identified for treatment across the county on all types of road, from urban cul-de-sacs to major A and B roads.

Due to the limited width of some roads, over 85% of the sites will unfortunately require a temporary road closure for the works to be carried out safely. Where road closures are not necessary, other forms of temporary traffic management will be in place, including temporary signals with convoy working where appropriate. On cul-de-sacs limited access will be available.

For the majority of A and B roads centre line studs/cat’s eyes also need to be removed and replaced under a temporary closure. It’s envisaged that stud removal will take place overnight, followed by dressing and sweeping operations during the following couple of days.

The replacement of studs and road markings on some sites will necessarily take place up to ten days later. Again, this will be during one night’s (8pm to 6am) road closure.

In reality, most of the closures will only be required for a few hours for the dressing operation, and we don’t envisage most being more than one day.

Steve Davenport, Shropshire Council’s Cabinet member for highways and parking, said:

“As well as improving and protecting our road surfaces, this important programme of work plays a crucial role in helping to prevent potholes and other defects forming in the future. Pothole treatment is very much about prevention as well as cure and this is one important way that we can aim to prevent potholes forming next winter.”

The programme of work may alter due to wet weather or other unforeseen events.

Information letters will be delivered to affected residents and businesses, and advance information signs will be on site at least ten days prior to the due start date.

Surface dressing sites summer 2019 Northeast Shropshire

1) WREXHAM ROAD [From: Shropshire Boundary – To: Wrexham Road Roundabout]

STUD REMOVAL – 30 May to 31 May, 8pm to 6am
DRESSING – 3 June to 5 June, 9.30am to 4pm
STUDS AND LINING – 18 June to 20 June, 8pm to 6am

2) WREXHAM ROAD ROUNDABOUT TO CHESTER ROAD ROUNDABOUT [From: Canal Bridge Joint – To: Joint near Hill rally Sign]

STUD REMOVAL – 29 May to 30 May, 8pm to 6am
DRESSING – 2 June to 4 June, 9.30am to 4pm
STUDS/LINING – 17 June to 18 June, 8pm to 6am

3) HEATH ROAD ROUNDABOUT TO TILSTOCK ROUNDABOUT

STUD REMOVAL – 31 May to 1 June, 8pm to 6am
DRESSING – 4 June to 6 June, 9.30am to 4pm
STUDS AND LINING – 20 June to 22 June, 8pm to 6am

4) STATION ROAD AND WAYMILLS, WHITCHURCH

DRESSING – 1 June to 3 June, 9.30am to 4pm
LINING – 10 June to 12 June, 9.30am to 4pm

5) A525 WHITCHURCH BUSINESS PARK ROUNDABOUT TO NANTWICH ROAD ROUNDABOUT [From: Low Bridge Sign at A5398 Roundabout – To: Roundabout Whitchurch Business Park

DRESSING – 1 June to 3 June, 9.30am to 4pm
LINING – 14 June to 15 June, 8pm to 6am

6) NEWCASTLE ROAD [From: Staffordshire County Boundary – To: Junction A51 Woore).

STUD REMOVAL – 28 May to 29 May, 8pm to 6am
DRESSING – 31 May to 2 June, 9.30am to 4pm
STUDS AND LINING – 12 June to 14 June, 8pm to 6am

7) A53 RUSH LANE ROUNDABOUT TO ADDERLEY ROAD ROUNDABOUT [From: Muller Roundabout – To Adderley Roundabout]

STUD REMOVAL – 23 May to 25 May, 8pm to 6am
DRESSING – 30 May to 1 June, 9.30am to 4pm
STUDS AND LINING – 6 June to 12 June, 8pm to 6am

8) WATERLOO TO GOBLINS LANE, WHIXALL [From: Goblins Lane – To: Ossage Lane]

PROPOSED DRESSING DATE – 5 June, MARKINGS 13 and 14 June (daytime)

9) GREEN LANE, WHIXALL [From: Rack Lane – To: Goblins Lane]

PROPOSED DRESSING DATE – 5 June, MARKINGS 13 and 14 June (daytime)

10) FOUR LANE ENDS CROSSROADS TO NORTHWOOD HALL JUNCTION, WHIXALL [From: Four Lanes farm – North Woodhall Junction – To: North Woodhall junction]

PROPOSED DRESSING DATE – 6 June, MARKINGS 12 and 13 June

10) WAGGONERS CROSROADS TO FENNS BOUNDARY AT HOLLY HOUSE, WHIXALL [From: junction Whitchurch to Welshend Road – To: Joint 80 Yards Whixall sign]

DRESSING – 5 June to 7 June, 7am to 5pm
LINING – 12 June to 13 June, 7am to 5pm

11) B5063 HORTON HALL

DRESSING 6 June, MARKINGS 13 and 14 June

North west Shropshire

1) PENTRE-DAFYDD XRDS TO YSGUBORISSA

PROPOSED PATCHING DATE – 4 and 5 June, DRESSING, 7 June, LINING 15 and 16 June (daytime)

2) CHIRK BANK VILLAGE (FROM B5070 30MPH TO OAKLANDS ROAD) [From: Lower Chirk Bank – To: Chirk Bank Village]

PROPOSED DRESSING – 7 June, MARKINGS 15 June (daytime)

3) HILL PARK , DUDLESTON HEATH

PROPOSED DRESSING – 7 June, MARKINGS 14 June (daytime)

4) HILL CRESCENT,  DUDLESTON HEATH

PROPOSED DRESSING – 7 June, MARKINGS 14 June (daytime)

5) REVELLS CLOSE, DUDLESTON HEATH

PROPOSED DRESSING – 6 June, MARKINGS 14 June (daytime)

6) PEEVER CLOSE, DUDLESTON HEATH

PROPOSED DRESSING DATE – 7 June, MARKINGS 14 June (daytime)

7) KAYMAUR CLOSE, DUDLESTON HEATH

PROPOSED DRESSING DATE – 6 June, MARKINGS 14 June (daytime)

8) B4398 STATION ROAD (LLANYMYNECH BRIDGE)

DRESSING – 12 June to 14 June, 9.30am to 4pm
MARKINGS – 19 June to 20 June, 9.30am to 4pm

9) MORTON CROSSROADS TO WHIP LANE

STUD REMOVAL – 3 June to 4 June, 8pm to 6am
DRESSING – 10 June to 12 June, 9.30am to 4pm
MARKINGS – 17 June to 18 June, 8pm to 6am

10) BROOKHOUSE ROAD, BRIDGEMAN AND POWIS AVENUE, OSWESTRY

DRESSING – 10 June, MARKINGS – 18 June

Central Shropshire

1) PULVERBATCH TO SMETHCOTT COMMON

PROPOSED DRESSING – 14 June, MARKINGS – 20 June (daytime)

2) PLEX LANE, ALBRIGHTON [From:A528 junction – To: SD joint prior Wood lane]

PROPOSED DRESSING – 12 June, MARKINGS – 1 June (daytime)

3) OAKVALE COURT, DORRINGTON

PROPOSED PATCHING – 3 June, DRESSING – 13 June, MARKINGS – 20 June (daytime)

4) HARLEY TO CRESSAGE

DRESSING 13 June to 15 June, 9.30am to 4pm
MARKINGS 19 June, 9.30am to 4pm

5) A5064 LONDON ROAD MAIN SECTION TO A5 [EITHER SIDE OF THE COLLEGE)

DRESSING – 12 June to 14 June, 9.30am to 4pm
MARKINGS – 18 June, 9.30am to 4pm

South west Shropshire

1) 9 PLOWDEN JUNCTION TO B4370 JUNCTION CWM HEAD

STUD REMOVAL – 5 June to 6 June, 8pm to 6am
DRESSING – 15 June to 17 June, 9.30am to 4pm
MARKINGS – 24 June to 26 June, 8pm to 6am

2) A488 ROCKHILL-COCKFORD BANK [From: Pen’y’wern junction – To: Llwn Road junction]

STUD REMOVAL 4 June to 5 June, 8pm to 6am
DRESSING 14 June to 16 June, 9.30am to 4pm
MARKINGS 20 June to 21 June, 8pm to 6am

3) JUNCTION WITH A4117 TO STONEY LANE [From: Bitterley Lane – To: End of road at Farm]

DRESSING 16 June (daytime), MARKINGS 24-25 June, 8pm to 6am

4) B4385 BRAMPTON ROAD, LYDBURY NORTH TO LAGDEN LANE

PATCHING –  31 May, 9.30am to 2.45pm
DRESSING – 15 June to 17 June, 9.30am to 2.45pm
MARKINGS – 21 June, 9.30 am to 2.45pm

South east Shropshire

1) B4373 FROM STANLEY LANE TO CANTERN COTTAGE

STUDS – 6 June to 7 June, 8pm to 6am
DRESSING – 17 June to 19 June, 9.30am to 4pm
MARKINGS – 1 July to 3 July, 8pm to 6am

2) THE SQUARE, STOTTESDON

PROPOSED DRESSING 16 June, MARKINGS 26 June (daytime)

3) A458 FROM A442 ROUNDABOUT – A458 ROUNDABOUT STOURBRIDGE ROAD EAST

DRESSING – 16 June to 18 June, 9.30am to 4pm
MARKINGS – 27 June to 28 June, 9.30am to 4pm

4) WOUNDALE-CHYKNELL HALL

DRESSING – 16 June, MARKINGS 3 July (daytime)

5) B4176 ROYAL OAK ROUNDABOUT TO COUNTY BOUNDARY

STUDS – 7 June to 9 June, 8pm to 6am
DRESSING – 19 June to 21 June, 9.30am to 4pm
MARKINGS – 4 July to 7 July, 8pm to 6am

Further information

Shropshire Council is spending around £6 million this year on resurfacing and surface dressing the county’s roads, ranging from unclassified rural roads to town centre roads to main ‘A’ roads. For more information, see our video below.

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Categories: Shropshire

News from our partners: SaTH celebrates life-changing clinical research

BBC Shropshire News Feed - Fri, 05/17/2019 - 10:50

News from our partners Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust (SaTH)

The Trust that runs Shropshire’s two acute hospitals will be highlighting the life-changing impact research has had on medicine when it celebrates International Clinical Trials Day on Monday.

Clinical Trials Day (Monday 20 May 2019) is celebrated around the world by research professionals to raise trial awareness and recognise patient, public and staff contributions to public health and medical progress.

More than 2,000 patients at The Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust (SaTH), which runs The Royal Shrewsbury Hospital (RSH) and the Princess Royal Hospital in Telford (PRH), took part in over 110 research studies in 2017/18, joining over 75,000 people in the West Midlands and 725,000 nationally, the highest number since records began.

Clinical Trials Day

Helen Moore, Clinical Trials Manager and Trust Lead Research Nurse for SaTH, said:

“Research is the only way we can continue to improve treatment of diseases and patient care.

“We know patients who take part in clinical trials do better than patients that don’t, even if they receive the standard treatment, so I encourage people to ask their doctor or nurse about how they can get involved in research. They can also view trials seeking volunteers at the UK Clinical Trials Gateway at www.ukctg.nihr.ac.uk.

“Trials aren’t only open to people who have a medical need, those who are fit and healthy can also take part. If you would like more information, contact the clinical research department on sath.research@nhs.net

On Monday, The Clinical Trials team will be running information stands outside the canteens at RSH and PRH from 12pm-2pm where staff and the public can win prizes by taking part in a research quiz, and play a clinical trials game.

Clinical Trials Day

Helen has written a staff blog talking about some of the trials SaTH are currently running. Her blog can be read here. Patients who have taken part in research at the Trust have also spoken about their experiences:

Alan Smith took part in the ‘Stampede’ study which aims to assess new treatment approaches for people affected by high-risk prostate cancer:

“I had no hesitation in getting involved in the trials programme.

“A friend of mine in Germany has already benefitted from revised treatment that was presented in this hospital. His consultant picked up that paper and has applied that treatment successfully, so not only do we see benefits locally here in Shropshire, but this hospital is having an effect worldwide, and that’s not overstating the case.

“The contribution that this hospital is making can make a greater contribution to the benefit of everybody.”

Harriet Swain took part in ‘The Big Baby Trial’ which started labour at 38 weeks for women whose babies appeared bigger than expected for their dates:

I was measuring quite large all the way throughout my pregnancy, so it was suggested that I become part of the project. Taking part in the study has been fantastic – all the way through I’ve had extra support, I’ve had someone to call if there’s been an issue. I felt really well supported throughout, both from my own midwife and the research midwife.

“Coming in at 38 weeks and having a [birth] date was really interesting. Although I felt nervous I actually really looked forward to the date, and I knew when things were going to happen. I was treated like an absolute queen in the midwifery unit: everybody was really interested in how I was getting on. I can’t put into words how fantastic the whole induction experience was, I just felt really well supported and really well looked after and I actually enjoyed my birthing.”

Harriet’s partner, Mat, added:

“The care and guidance we received from every staff member while we were in the hospital was absolutely fantastic and I think it helped us feel really comfortable with the whole process and made the labour process a lot more comfortable and straightforward for us. Obviously when little Orla arrived the staff were brilliant with us and I can’t thank everyone enough for that.”

Tom Beaumont took part in the ‘Simplified’ study which trialled natural vitamin D for patients receiving Dialysis:

“It is very important that we continue research and trials, for the simple reason that without this we’re not going to progress, and it’s important to us as patients that SaTH do continue and that we do participate in a programme with them.”

 

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Categories: Shropshire

Shropshire again exceeds target for getting people out of hospital quicker

BBC Shropshire News Feed - Fri, 05/17/2019 - 10:37

Health and social care organisations in Shropshire have again exceeded their Delayed Transfer of Care (DTOC) target in ensuring that residents don’t stay in hospital longer than they need to.

Shropshire’s Integrated Community Services team

Current figures for 2018/19 show the number of delayed discharges of care (DTOC) across Shropshire Council adult social care services and Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust (SaTH) have reduced from 21.2 per day to 10.4 per day, a 60% drop since 2017/18.

The Delayed Transfer of Care figures, produced by NHS England, show that during the current year the monthly number of delayed bed days has reduced. Both the council’s adult social care services and NHS partners in Shropshire have seen a sustained long-term improvement in the reduction of delays.

Adult social care (ASC) services, as well as acute settings such as hospitals, across England, are expected to maintain or reduce the number of patients who are delayed in such circumstances. The Government has set each organisation a target to reduce the delays of transfers of care. A Delayed Transfer of Care from acute or non-acute care occurs when a patient is ready to depart and is still occupying a hospital bed.

Total annual delayed days NHS ASC Joint Total Days 2016/17 6,275 5,333 2,896 14,504 2017/18 5,154 1,531 1,070 7,755 2018/19 3,381 118 293 3,792

 

Dean Carroll, Shropshire Council’s Cabinet member for adult social care and climate change, said:

“I am absolutely delighted we have again exceeded the Government’s target.

“We know that no one wishes to be in hospital longer than is necessary. Over the past year our adult social care teams have worked extremely hard with our health colleagues to ensure people are discharged as soon as they are well.

“I am very proud that their work has been nationally recognised, having been awarded Social Work Team of the Year, as well as being Highly Commended at the LGC (Local Government Chronicle) Awards and recognised.”

Nigel Lee, Chief Operating Officer at SaTH, said:

Together with the community teams, CCGs and local authorities, the Trust has halved the numbers of patients that are medically fit and awaiting transfer compared to last year. We now routinely transfer most patients within 48 hours of being fit, which is the national standard.

“We are very pleased to see yet another improvement this year which is testament to the hard work of staff across SaTH and the local system, and good news for our patients. No one wants to be in hospital longer than they need to be and we will continue to work together with our partners to look at ways of improving further.”

Shropshire’s Integrated Community Services (ICS) team, jointly run by Shropshire Council adult social care services and Shropshire Community Health NHS Trust, provide short-term support for patients who are ready to leave hospital. The team also work closely with partner organisations to identify people who need support to avoid an admission to hospital in the first place.

Steve Gregory, Director of Nursing at Shropshire Community Health NHS Trust, added:

“It is important that patients are cared for in the most appropriate setting for their needs.  We work with others within the Shropshire care system to make sure any delay is kept to a minimum.”

Tanya Miles, Shropshire Council’s assistant director – adult social care, added:

“Our integrated teams work extremely hard to support people to be discharged from hospital as soon as they are well, and help people avoid hospital admissions. This year their efforts have paid off in that we exceeded the targets that had been set nationally in reducing delayed transfers of care.

“We continue work with our health and social care partners to further explore possible solutions to help reduce the number of patients remaining in hospital and returning home, which we know they prefer to be.

“I would like to offer my congratulations to all those involved who I know have worked extremely hard to ensure that people return home from hospital as soon as possible. This is a great result from the team.”

Shropshire Council and SaTH have introduced a number of initiatives which have contributed to the reduction in DTOC figures. New programmes and initiatives to help patients return home sooner, or support those to avoid hospital admission, include:

Bespoke night time support (Two carers in a car) – This pilot scheme involves two carers who can travel to any household within the Shrewsbury area to provide support between 10pm and 7am. This support may be assistance for toilet care, to getting into bed at a later time than when regular carers are available, reassurance if just home from hospital, or as an alternative to a hospital admission where night support is required. Request for placements are often due to night support being required, but many people do not need this throughout the whole night. This scheme enables care support to be provided to a number of people throughout the night.

Carer support post-hospital discharge – Carers Trust 4all are offering support for carers discharged from hospital. Carers may feel anxious following a discharge that they have lost their routine, or the person they support on discharge may require more support. This service is now available throughout Shropshire, and is provided directly for the benefit of the carer at a time of increased challenges for the carer.

Extra care units – Where additional support is needed but can’t be provided within the person’s home, the council has commissioned four new ‘independence’ units located within a local housing development. These units are individually self-contained, where couples or single people can live, and where they can continue to receive therapeutic and care support prior to, and during, their transition when moving back to their own home. These units will be particularly beneficial for those discharged patients not able to return home from hospital. They will provide people with the environment where they can continue to regain and improve their ability to live in their own home, which for many people is what they wish to achieve, and evidence demonstrates is difficult to achieve if admitted to residential placements. This will allow people who require a period of enablement in an environment where they can be accompanied by their partner and receive further support to develop their independence skills.

Let’s Talk Local hub – There is also the hospital-based ‘Let’s Talk Local’ hub, which will offer information and advice around visiting times for people who are supporting friends, neighbours, and family members who are in hospital.

SaTH Frailty Intervention Team

A frailty service at the front door of Royal Shrewsbury Hospital was launched to reduce admission and reduce lengths of stay for patients aged 75+. Working together with Shropshire CCG, Shropshire Community Health NHS Trust and Shropshire Council, the new team combines health and social care professionals. It is a fast track service to get frailer patients over 75 quickly assessed, treated and discharged safely back to their own homes.

SaTH2Home

SaTH2Home was launched to provide rapid, same-day domiciliary care for patients awaiting care packages to start or who require support to settle back to their home. This enables discharge to be facilitated on the day a decision is reached that an individual no longer requires acute care. 

Further information

Adult social care DTOC figures

Current figures for 2018/19 show that adult social care services have exceeded their overall target by over 60%. For 2018/19 the target was to further reduce delays to an average of 17 per day, services have exceeded this target to now just 10.4 per day.

Adult social care services in Shropshire have worked closely with NHS trusts within Shropshire and also with out of county trusts where residents may be receiving care. This has resulted in significant improvement in the council’s results. In comparison to the year 2016/17 the results for 2018/19 show delays attributed to adult social care have reduced from 5,333 days to 118 days, a 98% improvement.

During 2016/17, on average, there were 39.7 delays per day. For the 2017/18 the target was to reduce this to 22.5 per day, which was achieved with 21.3. For 2018/19 the target was to further reduce delays to 17 per day. The services have exceeded this target, achieving 10.4.

Representatives from 10 different organisations – including Shropshire Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), Telford & Wrekin CCG, Shropshire Council, Telford & Wrekin Council, SaTH, and representatives from Shropshire partners in care (SPIC) – spent a week together in November 2018 to explore new ways of getting patients to leave hospital sooner so they can recover in the best possible place. 

What is a delayed transfer of care?

A delayed transfer of care from acute or non-acute care occurs when a patient is ready to depart from such care and is still occupying a bed. A patient is ready for transfer when:

  1. A clinical decision has been made that patient is ready for transfer and
  2. A multi-disciplinary team decision has been made that patient is ready for transfer and
  3. The patient is safe to discharge or transfer.

 

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Categories: Shropshire

Applications going to North planning committee on 28 May 2019

BBC Shropshire News Feed - Fri, 05/17/2019 - 10:20

The following planning applications will be considered by Shropshire Council’s North planning committee at its meeting at Shirehall, Shrewsbury on Tuesday 28 May 2019 at 2pm.

The meeting is open to the public and all are welcome to attend. To see the full agenda and reports, click here.

Land south of The Woodlands, Peplow, Market Drayton (19/01359/OUT) Outline application (layout for consideration) for residential development.

Oakfield, Middleton Road, Oswestry (18/05057/FUL) Erection of 3no. detached dwellings following demolition of existing structures; Formation of new vehicular access.

Decisions will be made available after the meeting on our online planning register which you can search by using the appropriate reference number or keyword.

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Categories: Shropshire

Free family fun at Shrewsbury’s Darwin Shopping Centre in May and June

BBC Shropshire News Feed - Fri, 05/17/2019 - 09:58

Children and families are invited to visit Shrewsbury’s Darwin Shopping Centre in the coming weeks to enjoy a range of free, themed, family fun with ReachOut Arts.

The circus, pirate and superhero-themed activities – listed below – will all take place in The Workshop Station opposite JD Sports.

The activities, dates and times are as follows:

Saturday 18 May 2019, 10am – 3pm

DAY AT THE CIRCUS

Roll up at the big top for a day at the circus with lots of stunts and tricks lined up for the day.

10am – 11am: Circus fun (Age 3+)

Join the circus fun with hula hoops, spinning plates and ribbons to create your very own circus act!

11.15am – 12pm: Dinky listen, move and groove session (Pre-school+)

Explore movement and dance with your little ones to a variety of themes in this session filled with games, dance and stories to help develop motor skills and encourage positive bonding.

12.15pm – 1pm: Circus spinning plate making (Pre-school+)

Explore your creativity with your little ones as you make your very own circus spinning plate to take home!

1pm – 2pm: Circus fun (Age 3+)

Another chance to join the circus fun with hula hoops, spinning plates and ribbons to create your very own circus act!

2.15pm – 3pm: Circus craft and colour (Pre-school+)

Enjoy an open session with our creative team for little ones to read, colour and enjoy circus themed crafts.

Saturday 25 May 2019, 10am – 3pm

PIRATES AHOY!

All aboard the Pirates’ ship for the little buccaneers in this day on the high seas!

10am – 11am: Pirate fun (Age 3+)

Join ReachOut on the Jolly Roger for an interactive Pirate fun session. Walk the plank, shoot the cannons, and learn some pirate talk. Fun for all ages!

11.15 – 12pm: Dinky listen, move and groove session (Pre-school+)

Explore movement and dance with your little ones to a variety of themes in this session filled with games, dance and stories to help develop motor skills and encourage positive bonding.

12.15pm – 1pm: Pirate parrot making (Pre-school +)

Get creative when you make the pirate’s ultimate sidekick in these craft workshops.

1pm – 2pm: Pirate fun (Age 3+)

Join ReachOut on the Jolly Roger for an interactive Pirate fun session. Walk the plank, shoot the cannons, and learn some pirate talk. Fun for all ages!

2.15pm – 3pm: Pirate craft (Pre-school+)

Enjoy an open session with our creative team for little ones to read, colour and enjoy pirate-themed crafts.

Wednesday 29 May and Saturday 1 June 2019, 10am – 3pm

SUPERHEROES ASSEMBLE!

Wannabe superheroes assemble to become the ultimate crusader and make superhero accessories to take home.

10am – 11am: Superhero school (Age 3+)

Come and learn how to be the ultimate superhero, with strength training and lessons in how to use your x-ray vision in this fun engaging workshop for all the family!

11.15am – 12pm: Dinky listen, move and groove session (Pre-school+)

Explore movement and dance with your little ones to a variety of themes in this session filled with games, dance and stories to help develop motor skills and encourage positive bonding.

12.15pm – 1pm: Superhero mask-making (Pre-school+)

Join the creative team for superhero mask-making fun. Create your very own themed Superhero mask to take home with you or to use in our fantastic superhero school workshops, coming up next

1pm-2pm: Superhero school (Age 3+)

Come and learn how to be the ultimate superhero, with strength training and lessons in how to use your x-ray vision in this fun engaging workshop for all the family!

2.15pm -3pm:  Superhero craft & colour (Pre-school+)

Come and join the Creative team in our superhero craft session and enjoy colouring, superhero badge making and a host of other fun activities for all ages.

For more information visit www.shrewsbury-shopping.co.uk.

Further information

To follow Shrewsbury shopping centres on social media, go to:

  • Facebook: @shrewsburyshopping
  • Twitter: @shop_shrewsbury
  • Instagram: @shrewsbury_shopping

The post Free family fun at Shrewsbury’s Darwin Shopping Centre in May and June appeared first on Shropshire Council Newsroom.

Categories: Shropshire

News from our partners: Welshampton and Lyneal Parish Council achieves national excellence award

BBC Shropshire News Feed - Thu, 05/16/2019 - 16:59

News from our partners Welshampton and Lyneal Parish Council 

Welshampton and Lyneal Parish Council is celebrating achieving the Quality Gold level of the national Local Council Award Scheme.

The Quality Gold standard is the highest level of the scheme and Welshampton and Lyneal Parish Council is the first local council in Shropshire to achieve it. The scheme exists to recognise excellence in governance, community engagement and continual council improvement.

The award was presented to the council’s Chair Councillor Andrew Haydon and Clerk Carole Warner by Shropshire Council Chairman Ann Hartley at Shropshire Council’s full Council meeting today, Thursday 16 May 2019.

From l-r: Councillor Mike Dinsdale – Vice Chairman, Welshampton and Lyneal Parish Council; Carole Warner – Clerk, Welshampton and lyneal Parish Council; Councillor Andrew Haydon – Chairman, Welshampton and Lyneal Parish Council; Ann Hartley, Chairman of Shropshire Council; Brian Williams, local Shropshire Councillor for The Meres; Gwilym Butler, Shropshire Council’s Cabinet member for communities, place planning and regulatory services.

Ann Hartley said:

“Although being a small parish council in the north of the county, Welshampton and Lyneal continually represent their community at all levels of government and Shropshire Council has been pleased to work them on many occasions.”

Councillor Andrew Haydon, Chair of Welshampton and Lyneal Parish Council, said:

“I am delighted that the parish council’s efforts, its understanding of good governance, the desire for community engagement and on-going planning for the parish’s future has been recognised.  I would especially like to thank and acknowledge our clerk, Carole Warner’s contribution as without her experience, professionalism and commitment to the council and the community we would not have attained this prestigious award.”

From l-r: Councillor Mike Dinsdale – Vice Chairman, Welshampton and Lyneal Parish Council; Carole Warner – Clerk, Welshampton and lyneal Parish Council; Councillor Andrew Haydon – Chairman, Welshampton and Lyneal Parish Council; Ann Hartley, Chairman of Shropshire Council; Brian Williams, local Shropshire Councillor for The Meres.

Clerk Carole Warner said:

“Achieving this award recognises the effort and hard work put in over the years by everyone involved with the council. Without the backing of councillors who always support each other and look for ways to make a difference, we could not have reached Quality Gold.  Every member of the council team has reason to be proud.”

Katrina Baker, MBE, President of Shropshire Association of Local Councils and Chairman of the Accreditation Panel, said:

 “We congratulate Welshampton and Lyneal Parish Council in obtaining Quality Gold.  They have worked so hard to achieve this award from being the first council in Shropshire to achieve Quality standard, the middle level of the scheme, just over one year ago.”

Further information

In England: There are approximately 10,000 local councils (town councils and parish councils) and 100,000 councillors.  They collect around £400m annually in precept income, investing around £2billion annual in local communities.

In the county of Shropshire:  There are 180 parish councils (153 in Shropshire, 27 in Telford & Wrekin) with nearly 2,000 parish and town councillors (1977 seats, 1688 in Shropshire and 289 in Telford & Wrekin). 

The Shropshire Association of Local Councils has 96% in membership (only 6 in Shropshire and 1 in TWC remain outside of membership).

Local councils are at grass roots level of governanceLocal councillors are, real hyperlocal heroes, who are spending their time and energy helping their communities. This should be celebrated and recognised more. Local councils are actually becoming one of the most important parts of local government as they are closest to the people and covering the issues that really matter in a time of real disenchantment. They are the only growing part too as several are created each year.

Local Council Award Scheme: Is a peer assessed programme that has been designed to both provide the tools and encouragement to those councils at the beginning of their improvement journeys, as well as promoting and recognising councils that are at the cutting edge of the sector. It is through the sector working together to share best practice, drive up standards and supporting those who are committed to improving their offer to their communities that individual councils and the sector as a whole will reach its full potential. In Shropshire, Telford & Wrekin we have 15 councils that have achieved the Foundation level, 3 who have achieved Quality and one has achieved the top award Quality Gold.  This prestigious award recognises that the council achieves good practice in governance, community engagement and council improvement, going above and beyond their legal obligations, leading their communities and continuously seeking opportunities to improve and develop even further.  These councils are at the front line of the government’s localism agenda and are doing as much as they can to delivery services whilst being efficient and cost-effective.

For more information contact SALC at alc@shropshire.gov.uk; 01743 252744.

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Categories: Shropshire

New group set to boost Oswestry by delivering key projects

BBC Shropshire News Feed - Thu, 05/16/2019 - 16:02

A new group has been set up to review the priorities within Oswestry’s 2020 Neighbourhood Plan and to help deliver activities and projects that will benefit the town, its residents and its businesses.

Made up of representatives from Shropshire Council, Oswestry Town Council and Oswestry Business Improvement District (BID) the Future Oswestry Group held its inception meeting on 2 May [2019] at the town’s Guildhall.

The group will help to deliver each organisation’s activities and projects through working more closely together.

Key members of the group include: Councillor Steve Charmley and Councillor Robert Macey representing Shropshire Council; Councillor Chris Schofield and Councillor Sandy Best representing Oswestry Town Council; and Adele Nightingale and Ian Follington representing the Oswestry Business Improvement District (BID). Support is provided by officers from Oswestry Town Council and Shropshire Council.

Regular meetings will be held for the group, which will now look to agree its aims and objectives, and develop a programme of activities.

Councillor Steve Charmley, deputy leader of Shropshire Council and Cabinet member for economic growth, said:

“This new group is great news for Oswestry. Our first meeting was really positive and by meeting on a regular basis we’ll be able to ensure that we all work together for the benefit of Oswestry, and all who live,  work  or run a business in the town.”

Adele Nightingale, Oswestry BID manager said:

“The BID sees this as a great opportunity to work with both Shropshire and Oswestry Town councils, to ensure a joined up and co-ordinated approach for the future of Oswestry. We are very keen to deliver projects in the short and medium-term whilst always considering the longer term plans. Exciting times are ahead for Oswestry!”

Councillor Sandy Best from Oswestry Town Council, said:

“This was a positive meeting and the Town Council looks forward to working with Shropshire Council and the BID to develop and deliver projects that will make a tangible difference in the town. It is important that the community are aware of this work and have an opportunity to contribute to it.”

The post New group set to boost Oswestry by delivering key projects appeared first on Shropshire Council Newsroom.

Categories: Shropshire

Charity begins at home (the brand new Shrewsbury Monopoly home)

BBC Shropshire News Feed - Thu, 05/16/2019 - 15:50

Two Shrewsbury charities are being sought from today (Thursday 16 May 2019) – to ‘Pass GO’ on the brand new official Monopoly game for the town.

The charities will get to star on the brand new board – on Community Chest spaces all on their own.

Shrewsbury Monopoly – Community Chest card

Jake Houghton, Custom Games Executive at Winning Moves UK, makers of the new game under license from Monopoly owners Hasbro, Inc, said:

“It’s our way of thanking the public for getting behind the game so very enthusiastically.

“To qualify the charities have to be clearly Shrewsbury focused. They must also be currently registered with The Charity Commission for England and Wales.”

Polls are open for nominations and will last a week, until 23.59pm next Wednesday (22 May 2019).

It was announced a fortnight ago that Shrewsbury is getting its very own official Monopoly. The public was invited at the time of the announcement to send in votes and suggestions to star on the Monopoly spaces and Community Chest and Chance cards. One card idea, perhaps cheekily, which has caught a lot of attention is one sending players to Telford rather than the Monopoly jail.

Jake Houghton added:

“The response has been absolutely fantastic and way exceeded our expectations. More than 4,000 votes have poured in so far. We would like to formally thank each and every person who has sent in nominations. Now, as our way of a thank you, two town charities will now get to star on their very own Monopoly Community Chest spaces.”

Lezley Picton, Shropshire Council’s Cabinet member for culture, leisure, waste and communications, said:

“We’ve got lots of great charities who play a vital role in making Shrewsbury a fantastic place to live, work and visit. They do an excellent job of helping look after those who need extra support, helping to maintain our green spaces and community buildings and supporting the work of thousands of dedicated volunteers.

“They truly deserve to feature in the game – but it will be difficult picking just two.”

The new edition will be available at all major retailers starting in October in Shrewsbury and beyond, as well as at online retailers including Amazon.

Jake Houghton added:

“Shrewsbury Castle, The Abbey and The Dana (ex-prison) have all polled very well so far, The game will feature the great and the good of Shrewsbury.”

Polls for Charity suggestions: by email to: info@6starpr.co.uk ; or to the official Shrewsbury Monopoly Facebook page; or by good old-fashioned post, to:  Shrewsbury Monopoly charity nominations, Winning Moves UK, 7 Praed Street, London W2 1NJ.

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Categories: Shropshire

Plans revealed for a new visitor centre near The Mere, Ellesmere

BBC Shropshire News Feed - Thu, 05/16/2019 - 14:05

Plans have been revealed for a new visitor centre, café and play area close to The Mere in Ellesmere.

Located at the former Swan Hill depot site, the new centre would include a café and indoor soft-play area, and have space for exhibitions. There would be an outdoor adventure play area for children, and it’s hoped that the former depot buildings will be taken on by an outward bounds company offering opportunities for water sports and other outdoor activities.

A preferred design for the café has now been selected:-

Ellesmere Country Park – visitor centre plans

 

The proposals are now subject to funding being secured and planning permission granted. If all goes well it’s hoped the new facility will be open by Easter 2020.

Lezley Picton, Shropshire Council’s Cabinet member for culture, leisure, waste and communications, said:

“The moving of our countryside depot at Swan Hill presented an opportunity to invest in the site to offer a new all-year-round visitor facility.

“The aim of the project is twofold. Firstly we want to develop and promote The Mere at Ellesmere Country Park as the outdoor recreation centre of Shropshire’s Lake District. We can do this by creating more outdoor recreational opportunities for visitors, so that it delivers an all year-round family visitor/tourist destination, increasing usage out of the main spring and summer seasons.

“The provision of a new visitor café/centre will also act as a hub to promote other attractions within north Shropshire and beyond –   acting as a stepping stone into the Meres & Mosses landscape of north Shropshire.”

Shaun Burkey, Shropshire Council’s country parks and sites officer, said:-

“Our objective is to build a new visitor centre with a large well-used children’s outdoor adventure play area that provides for a family audience with young children. This offers the opportunity to develop the potential of the site so that it becomes an all year-round visitor destination for sport and recreation that will increase visitor numbers out of the main tourism season.

“We would modernise the existing outdoor play area and remove all but one of the neglected buildings at the depot, to provide space for the new facilities to increase visitors’ enjoyment and their experience of The Mere.”

Ann Hartley, local Shropshire Councillor for the Ellesmere Urban division, said:

“It’s great that a derelict area could soon be regenerated. It would be tastefully developed, as we are very mindful that this is a very sensitive area, and it’s essential that any buildings are in keeping with area. This development would also complement the busy play area, enhancing the facilities that are currently provided.”

European funding is being sought from The Rural Development Programme for England. Ellesmere Town Council has also contributed to the project which would bring three new jobs to the town.

The post Plans revealed for a new visitor centre near The Mere, Ellesmere appeared first on Shropshire Council Newsroom.

Categories: Shropshire

Blog: Mental Health Awareness Week: A personal story

BBC Shropshire News Feed - Wed, 05/15/2019 - 12:43

To mark Mental Health Awareness Week, a member of staff and his manager talk to us about their experience of mental health.

Mental Health Image

Employee

Suffering with mental health is one of the hardest things I’ve had to go through, and talking about this, it is even harder. It’s so hard to be open about your feelings when people just belittle you and brush it off just because they haven’t experienced it.

Every day I constantly tell myself that I don’t matter and constantly battle with the hell inside my head. I feel like sometimes all I can do is lie in bed, and hope to fall asleep before I fall apart. It’s taken me a while to accept that mental health is a part of me and it’s what makes me the person I am today. My anxiety was always one of my biggest setbacks, it stopped me doing a lot throughout my life. I’ve chosen to speak out because I want to help get rid of the stigma that people have over mental health; a lot of young males don’t reach out for help because they believe it’s a sign of weakness.

I am good for a while – I’ll talk more, laugh more, sleep and eat normally, but then something happens like a switch turns off somewhere and all I am left with is the darkness of my mind.

But each time it seems like I sink deeper and deeper and it’s scary. I’m terrified that one day I won’t make it back up. I feel like I am gasping for air, screaming for help but everyone just looks at me with confused faces, wondering what I am struggling over when they’re all doing just fine and it makes me feel crazy. It’s like sitting in a room surrounded by a ton of people that you know well and love. People who know you and support and worry for you, but you still feel overwhelmingly alone. It’s like having everyone tell you they love you and how much they appreciate you but still feel like they don’t care. It’s like a silent torture.

I think people just think they can spot someone with depression; that they would be the sad person sat in the corner with a grey cloud on their head, but even now people don’t realise how much I suffer. I try to keep this fake smile on my face just so people don’t ask me what’s wrong (mainly because I find it so hard to explain what thoughts are running through my head). I always try to make everyone smile and have a laugh with people, just so people don’t have to go through the same pain that I go through.

I worked in a place before this where mental health was frowned upon, that the lads in work would just call you a skiver when you physically couldn’t pull yourself out of bed because you had no sleep the night before because of all the thoughts in your head kept you up all night.

The tiniest complaint from a customer could set me off any minute, it was so hard and tiring to keep up this fake personality so the people in work wouldn’t knock you down lower than you were before. Eventually it led to me having 2 weeks off work and to work on myself as a person. I opened up to my doctor who prescribed me some antidepressants and referred me to counselling. Although these both helped me I feel like being open to my family and friends is what helped me through every day. Being more open and trusting with people and talking about my feelings has helped me out so much that now I’ve reduced my medication and am managing well. I think since starting at the council having a team that supports mental health and that are so easy and open to talk to also helps so much, we all support each other, and I feel like I don’t have to put on that fake smile at all.

I think it’s so important to just ask people in the team if they’re okay because, just by asking that one question, it can change their mood and being open and honest to that question can change your whole life.

Manager

Be kind. Always

He lit up the room during his interview – he was confident and showed a real passion
for his work. I had no doubt that I wanted him to be part of our team. I would never
have guessed that he struggles every day, and I’m sure that I would still be unaware
if he hadn’t been really open with me from the start.

That’s the point really, to quote a well-known phrase, ‘Everyone is fighting a battle
that you know nothing about. Be kind. Always.’

Approximately 1 in 4 people in the UK will experience a mental health problem each
year. That’s a lot of people and it’s very likely that you know someone who is
struggling.

I wasn’t shocked when he told me, I simply listened. In my opinion, it’s not something
that people should feel that they need to hide. The more open we are, the more
aware everyone will be, which surely can only be a good thing.

Whenever he’s having a bad day I listen, try to understand and make sure that I’m
mindful of the work he’s been tasked with. I know that this makes it a little easier for
him to come into work every day, which he does without fail.

He’s really thriving and I’m so proud that he’s part of my team.

Help and advice

To find out what mental health support is available in Shropshire click here

The post Blog: Mental Health Awareness Week: A personal story appeared first on Shropshire Council Newsroom.

Categories: Shropshire

News from our partners: Bereavement book republished with the help of SaTH’s End of Life Care service

BBC Shropshire News Feed - Tue, 05/14/2019 - 15:58

News from our partners Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust (SaTH) 

An ebook aimed at helping people find better ways to manage bereavement has been updated and republished with the help of The Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust’s End of Life Care team.

Jules Lewis

Jules Lewis, End of Life Care Facilitator, and Jules Lock, End of Life Care Lead Volunteer, have teamed up with Roy Lilley, founder of the Academy of Fabulous Stuff, to update ‘Bereavement – A Practical Guide for NHS Managers’ for a contemporary audience. The new text includes ‘101 questions about bereavement’ to challenge, make us think and develop better plans.

The book was originally written by the late Professor Anne Faulkner with Roy in 1996 when Roy promised to find a better way after his dad’s death in hospital.

Bereavement book

Bereavement – A Practical Guide for NHS Managers is available to download as an e-book for free by clicking here.

Jules Lewis said:

“Jules Lock and I are thrilled to have joined forces with Roy to rewrite this wonderful handbook.

“Sensitive end of life care is vital and requires exceptional attention to detail, but it can be a challenge to managers and organisations as loved ones go through what is generally a harrowing experience.

“It is an absolute privilege for staff to support relatives, friends and carers at their time of greatest need and we hope that this e-book will help people to think about the best possible ways they can work to help those who have been bereaved.”

The release of ‘Bereavement – A Practical Guide for NHS Managers’ comes during Dying Matters Awareness Week which SaTH are celebrating in a number of ways, including hosting a Dying Matters Conference on Thursday 16 May 2019.

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Categories: Shropshire

Expert land agent wins contract to manage Shropshire Council’s smallholdings

BBC Shropshire News Feed - Mon, 05/13/2019 - 11:57

The Shrewsbury-based team of national property consultancy, Carter Jonas, has been appointed to manage Shropshire Council’s smallholdings and the agricultural land that it owns.

Smallholding

Carter Jonas, which boasts over 1,300,000 acres of the UK countryside under their stewardship, will work with the council’s estates team to look after its agricultural estate of around 692 acres, which includes 16 freehold smallholdings ranging from 7.68 to 107.36 acres, three cottages and three leasehold properties, for the next three years.

Steve Charmley, Shropshire Council’s Cabinet member for assets, economic growth and regeneration, said:

“We’re pleased to be working with Carter Jonas who have a wealth of experience in managing similar estates across the country.

“Shropshire is a rural county, with agriculture being a predominant employer and major part of the economy. By employing a land agent with the right expertise to manage the properties we can continue to support the county’s agricultural economy.

Harry Torrance, Partner, Carter Jonas, said:

“This is a positive appointment for Carter Jonas and one that will draw on our wide-ranging expertise. The complex financial conditions facing all public sector bodies means there is a need for well-informed and effective use of their assets, especially real estate.

“Carter Jonas has advised a number of local authorities with this aim, and look forward to working with the staff at Shirehall, the occupiers, and other key stakeholders to help ensure the council’s estate contributes to making Shropshire a great place to live, learn, work and visit.”

 

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Categories: Shropshire

Decisions made by Central planning committee on 9 May 2019

BBC Shropshire News Feed - Mon, 05/13/2019 - 10:20

The following decisions were made by Shropshire Council’s Central planning committee at its meeting at Shirehall, Shrewsbury on Thursday 9 May 2019.

The Stew, Frankwell, Shrewsbury (17/05538/FUL) Proposed refurbishment, extension and conversion of the Stew into 7 no. apartments, office, spa / leisure, coffee shop and garages.

Decision

That authority to grant planning permission be delegated to the Head of Planning Services subject to:

  • The conditions recommended in appendix 1 and any minor modifications to these conditions deemed necessary; and
  • The signing of a Section 106 agreement to secure a contribution towards flood maintenance.

Car park, The Dana, Shrewsbury (18/03206/FUL) Erection of residential building providing ten apartments following demolition of existing prison reception building; formation of associated car parking, cycle parking and shared storage space; landscaping scheme; revised vehicle and pedestrian access.

Decision

That planning permission be granted as per the officer’s recommendation subject to:

  • The conditions set out in Appendix 1; and
  • That Condition 8 be amended to ensure that the condition was implemented prior to occupation of the building.

Residential development land adjacent Chronicle House, Chester Street, Shrewsbury (19/01500/FUL) Application under Section 73A of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 for the erection of a sixth floor to provide a roof top conservatory with glazed ballustrading (revised scheme).

Decision

That planning permission be refused for the reason given within the officer’s report and the additional reason within the additional letters schedule.

Proposed affordable dwelling south of Woodfield, Cruckton, Shrewsbury (19/01303/OUT) Outline application for the erection of one (affordable) dwelling to include access.

Decision

That consideration of the application be deferred to a future meeting of this Committee at the request of the agent, local councillor and parish council to allow for information to be provided in relation to the location of the site and its relationship to Cruckton.

Maesbrook Nursing Home, Church Road, Shrewsbury (19/01132/FUL) Erection of first floor extensions to north east part of main building to create additional bedrooms; link corridor to additional bedrooms in roofspace with increase in height of roof and insertion of rooflights (revised scheme to include raise ridge height on approved extension to annex roof with fire escape from new first floor link bridge together with zinc roof line raised).

Decision

That consideration of the application be deferred to a future meeting of this Committee to allow for information to be provided in relation to the impact of the development on the protected Copper Beech tree in an adjoining property.

80 Upper Road, Shrewsbury (19/00660/FUL) Erection of first floor extension to side over existing garage, alterations to window material to side and rear elevations, addition of dormer window to rear elevation.

Decision

That planning permission be granted as per the officer’s recommendation subject to the conditions set out in Appendix 1.

 

For further information relating to the decisions go to our online planning register and search for the application by using the reference number or keyword.

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Categories: Shropshire

“Give a child a chance and a future”, urges foster care team

BBC Shropshire News Feed - Mon, 05/13/2019 - 10:04

There are about 65,000 children living with 55,000 foster families throughout the UK… and every 20 minutes another child comes into care needing a foster family.

However, there is always a shortfall of carers – in Shropshire alone, another 25 are urgently needed to ensure that local children can remain close to their social and family networks, as well as continue at their current school.

That’s the background to this year’s Foster Care Fortnight, which takes place from today (Monday 13 May 2019) until Sunday 26 May 2019.

Foster Care Fortnight 2018 – the Fostering Network

Lisa Preston, responsible for leading on Shropshire’s fostering service, said:-

“Fostering, for many children, can be their first positive experience of family life, and our carers do an incredible job of providing them with the stability and confidence they need.

“Carers literally change the future for the children they care for, giving them a chance to rebuild their lives from what can be very difficult circumstances.

“But every year, as the number of children needing a home rises, some carers drop out of the system – so we constantly need to grow the pool so that children and young people coming into care are able to live with a carer whose skills and experience meet their individual needs.

“Nationally, there is a particular need for carers to come forward to foster teenagers, sibling groups and children with complex needs – and Shropshire is no different.

“Our priority is to recruit enough local carers to avoid Shropshire children having to go out of the county to be looked after.”

 

So, who can foster?

Lisa said:-

“Our carers come from all walks of life, so never assume that ‘your face won’t fit’.  Your age, gender and ethnic background are not barriers to being a great foster carer, and neither do you need to own your own home or have a partner. You simply need to be able to give the support and care that a child needs.

“Often any challenges you’ve faced in life can be a real attribute.

“Many carers who already have children, or a disability that makes it hard to leave the home, are able to make it a full-time role, enabled by the fees and allowances we provide. Others combine fostering with a part or even full-time job. Because our children have such diverse needs, we can fit fostering around you. The great support network we provide means that no one is ever on their own.”

Claire from Much Wenlock is a carer who found space in her heart and in her home for fostering after her marriage broke down, and she was left trying to look after her disabled son and doing 12-hour days to keep the money coming in.

Claire said:-

“That’s when I looked at the possibility of being a foster carer, remaining at home to be there for my son but also able to let other children into my life. I never felt that there were any barriers to being a foster carer as a single parent. I felt supported by friends and family; my son was going out to day centres, was very settled and had his own life. And the social services team couldn’t have been more supportive. 

“If you have the time and space in your life, you won’t regret it – and don’t imagine it’s not for you because you are single or, like me, because you have a child of your own with disabilities… or if you are disabled yourself.  Often that experience will give you a unique perspective as well as empathy and patience.

“I’ve fostered many children since it all began, and I’d like to think that I’ve given each child a chance to get through a difficult time and grow as young people.”

 

One key concern for every prospective carer who already has children is how their own family will cope with sharing their home.  

Fostering – Foster Care Fortnight 2018

At the time she started, Ludlow-based foster carer Louise’s eldest daughter was 10.

Louise said:-

“How would my own children react to another child coming into their home was obviously a big consideration. I needn’t have worried. They were fine about it and I could see that they were gaining from it too. They were interacting with the foster children and realising they were not any different to them. In fact, without the support of all of my family, I just couldn’t have done it!”

That was nearly 30 years ago, and – 150 children later – Louise has no regrets. She has been short-term fostering for all those years – that can mean anything from a few days to a few months as the child’s parents resolve a situation in their own lives or the child is adopted. She also provides placements for young mothers and their babies – helping them adapt to the sometimes-daunting task of having your first child when you may not have a lot of family support locally.

Louise said:-

“Looking back it seemed like an obvious thing to do. I knew that not enough people were coming forward to give children homes – which meant that many were going into residential care. I thought: ‘Why not me?’”

Ed Potter, Shropshire Council’s Cabinet member for children’s services, said:

“All sorts of people from all walks of life can and do foster. You get plenty of time during the application process to decide whether it really is you – and you’re never under any obligation to continue. There’s always advice on hand and lots of training available. People who want to foster simply need to care about children, have good communication skills, have a spare room and be ready for a challenge.”

If fostering sounds like something you could do, then why not get in touch on 0800 783 8798 or visit shropshire.gov.uk/fostering.

 

The post “Give a child a chance and a future”, urges foster care team appeared first on Shropshire Council Newsroom.

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News from our partners: Hospital trust to celebrate Dying Matters Awareness Week

BBC Shropshire News Feed - Fri, 05/10/2019 - 15:52

News from our partners Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust (SaTH)

We’re all going to die, but many of us find it difficult to talk, or even think, about what lies ahead, or consider what it might feel like to lose someone we care for.

The End of Life Care Service at The Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital Trust (SaTH), which runs the Princess Royal Hospital in Telford (PRH) and the Royal Shrewsbury Hospital (RSH), believes we should all be able to talk openly about death and dying, so they’re celebrating Dying Matters Awareness Week, which begins on Monday 13 May 2019, in a number of ways.

On Monday a Bereavement Workbook, co-written by Roy Lilley, founder of the Academy of Fabulous Stuff, will be re-published after 23 years with the help of SaTH’s End of Life Care Facilitator Jules Lewis and End of Life Care Lead Volunteer Jules Lock, who helped him to update it.

Jules Lewis (left) and Jules Lock (right).

With thanks to the late Professor Anne Faulkner, who wrote the original with Roy, the book aims to help people find better ways to manage end of life and bereavement care.

On Wednesday, Jules Lewis will be live on Jim Hawkins’ BBC Radio Shropshire show playing a selection of #deadgoodmusic; songs submitted via Twitter that celebrate who we are and what we love in life and death.

On Thursday, the End of Life Care Service will host a Dying Matters Conference at RSH. A day of learning and sharing best practice, the conference will host a number of speakers, show films, play some #deadgoodmusic, and even stage an innovative play.

Throughout the week, the team will publicise ‘Taste for Pleasure’, a ground-breaking initiative that gives Nil By Mouth patients tastes of their favourite flavours as they receive end of life care.

Jules Lewis said:

“The Theme for this year’s Dying Matters Awareness Week is ‘Are We Ready?’, and looks at the practical and emotional steps we all need to take to be ready for the end of our lives.

“Death and dying is very difficult to deal with, even for staff who work in hospitals, but we only have one chance to get it right for our patients and so it’s important that we can be open and frank about our feelings towards it.

“If we can all have a conversation about how we would like to be looked after and any preferences we might have when we reach the end of our lives, we can help the people who care for us to make sure we have the best possible experience.”

The post News from our partners: Hospital trust to celebrate Dying Matters Awareness Week appeared first on Shropshire Council Newsroom.

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News from our partners: NHS Providers Chief Executive praises Trust’s progress and leadership

BBC Shropshire News Feed - Fri, 05/10/2019 - 15:12

News from our partners Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust (SaTH)

The Chief Executive of the organisation which represents hundreds of NHS Trusts has praised Shropshire’s acute hospitals for their leadership, progress and ‘desire to learn and improve’.

Chris Hopson, Chief Executive of NHS Providers, made his comments after a visit to the Princess Royal Hospital (PRH) in Telford.

Chris Hopkin visiting

NHS Providers, is an association of NHS trusts which represents every variety of trust, from large acute and specialist hospitals, through to community, ambulance and mental health trusts.

Chris visited wards and departments including Maternity, Postnatal, Estates, Cardiology and Respiratory at PRH, which is run by The Shrewsbury and Telford Hospital NHS Trust (SaTH).

He said:

“It was great to see the passion and enthusiasm of the next generation of leaders for continuous improvement and improvement methodology.

“It was great to see the Chief Executive and talk to the wider Board. There is strong and purposeful leadership to address a significant range of challenges, strongly focussed on providing a continuously improving service to local people.”

In Maternity, Chris met Jill Whitaker, Matron for Consultant Unit Maternity Services, who showed improvements including information boards which are used to share a lot of key data in an efficient manner during daily team ‘huddles’.

Chris said:

“I was very impressed with the thoughtfulness, desire to learn and improve, and patient and safety focus of senior and maternity service leaders, given past issues affecting maternity services. There is a strong commitment to providing an outstanding service for local women.”

Chris also praised the Postnatal Ward, which was awarded SaTH’s first Diamond Exemplar Award, for “continually improving the quality of the service they provide with a strong emphasis on ensuring patient safety”.

He also visited the Cardiac Ambulatory Unit at PRH.

He said:

“This is a good way to increase patient flow, improve discharge rates and provide care better tailored to patient needs.”

In Estates, Chris was shown how SaTH is using Lean methodology through its partnership with the Virginia Mason Institute in Seattle, to improve efficacy and reduce waste.

He also praised the use of SaTH’s Values In Practice (VIP) Awards.

He said:

“I was struck by how effective the use of staff awards schemes is. This helps recognise excellence, but also flags to rest of organisation where to find best practice.”

Following his visit, he added:

“Yet again, I have been incredibly struck by how reliant the NHS is on the brilliance, commitment, professionalism, resourcefulness, resilience and skill of its frontline leaders, from Ward Managers and Matrons to Corporate Service and business managers. They are often unsung heroes and heroines.”

The post News from our partners: NHS Providers Chief Executive praises Trust’s progress and leadership appeared first on Shropshire Council Newsroom.

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Drawn of the Dead coming to Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery

BBC Shropshire News Feed - Fri, 05/10/2019 - 15:09

Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery (SM&AG) are preparing to open a new exhibition ‘Drawn of the Dead’ celebrating the work of internationally famous comic artist and former Comics Laureate, Charlie Adlard.

Drawn of the Dead will open to the public on Saturday 1 June 2019 in partnership with the Comics Salopia festival which brings a stunning selection of comic artists to the county as well as celebrating the county’s home-grown talent.

In this exciting new exhibition visitors will find a stunning selection of Charlie’s original works from the Walking Dead comic series displayed alongside immersive, set piece installations created by sculptor Andrew Bryden.

Comic art of Charlie Adlard

AMC’s blockbusting television show, The Walking Dead, now in its 9th season is a spin off from the revered comic book series created by Robert Kirkman and Shropshire’s own Charlie Adlard.

This unique exhibition extends to the museum balcony where visitors will see the breadth of Charlie’s work beyond The Walking Dead. Images from cult French comic Vampire State Building are displayed alongside Charlie’s life drawing and original books Code Flesh and White Death.

Lezley Picton, Shropshire Council’s Cabinet member for culture, leisure, waste and communications, said:

“Shrewsbury and Shropshire has a huge amount of creative talent and I’m thrilled that Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery, having partnered with the new Comic Festival, are able to display some of this work.

“Charlie Adlard’s work is internationally famous so it’s fantastic that we are able to display some of his original artwork in what will be exciting and interactive visitor experience. I can’t wait to see it!”

Charlie Adlard, said:

“I’m incredibly proud to have this exhibition in my home town. And, not only is it here in Shrewsbury, but it’ll be the best exhibition of my works staged anywhere. It’s going to be a truly immersive experience.”

SM&AG will be working with education sector partners including Nottingham Trent University. The aim is to give opportunities to students on theatre design courses to work with SM&AG on the build of the exhibition.

Drawn of the Dead will be open at SM&AG until Sunday 3 November 2019.

For more information about Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery, click here.

Shrewsbury Comic Festival

Shrewsbury Comic Festival will take place on Saturday 1 June and Sunday 2 June 2019.

SM&AG will be running a host of special events, workshops, talks and book signings over the course of the Comic Festival.

The Comic Festival will take place at a number of venues across Shrewsbury and will celebrate the work of Charlie Adlard and many other famous comic artists who call the town home.

Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery is owned and operated by Shropshire Council.

Further Information

About Charlie Adlard

Charlie began his work in the UK on the 2000 AD series including Judge Dredd and Armitage. He also worked on White Death with the local Robbie Morrison. In the United States, he is best known for his work on The X-Files, Marvel and DC comics and The Walking Dead.

Charlie Adlard

He has been the penciller on The Walking Dead since 2004 and was the UK Comics Laureate from February 2017 – February 2019.

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Categories: Shropshire

Gas mains upgrade to start on Shrewsbury’s Mardol Head on 20 May 2019

BBC Shropshire News Feed - Fri, 05/10/2019 - 13:50

News from Cadent and Shropshire Council

Shrewsbury’s Mardol Head is set for a double revamp – above and below ground.

Local gas network Cadent and Shropshire Council are working in tandem to renew ageing gas mains and then lay a smart new paving scheme in one of Shrewsbury’s main shopping areas.

Starting on Monday 20 May 2019 Cadent will begin replacing the old iron mains with tough new plastic pipes. The work is expected to take up to eight weeks and will ensure local residents and traders can continue to heat their homes and power their businesses into the next century.

Follow this link for a map of the Mardol Head gas works and diversion routes

To keep staff and road users safe while the work is underway, Mardol Head and Shoplatch will be closed to through traffic for up to eight weeks and a signed diversion route will be in place. Access will be maintained for businesses, residents and emergency vehicles and all car parks will be available.

Whilst the road is closed for the work to take place contractors working for Shropshire Council will take advantage to carry out minor maintenance works. Once the pipes are in the ground, Shropshire Council will continue a major facelift of the street’s paving.

Craig Horrocks, who heads up Cadent’s gas mains replacement programme in the West Midlands region, said:

“We are investing in new gas pipes so that local people can continue enjoy safe and reliable gas supplies until the end of the century.

“The pipes have been selected for replacement due to their age and in accordance with the prioritisation policy agreed with energy watchdog Ofgem and the Health and Safety Executive.

“This essential work has been carefully co-ordinated with Shropshire Council so that any newly resurfaced areas are not disturbed by planned gas work in the near future. We appreciate this work may be disruptive and will do everything we can to minimise the disruption.

“Access to businesses will be maintained. Our customer team will liaise with local residents and businesses to answer questions and respond to any concerns.

Dan Green, assistant network management officer with Shropshire Council, said:

“Cadent have a regulatory obligation to replace gas mains deemed ‘at risk’ within a set timescale. Work to replace the gas main on Shoplatch has become more urgent, meaning that the work is now required for completion this year. Given the planned resurfacing of Pride Hill and Mardol Head it seemed logical that the gas main replacement work was brought forward to pre-date this resurfacing work.

“Shropshire Council has contacted other utility companies to ask that any other planned maintenance works are undertaken while the road is closed, and will carry out its own minor maintenance works during this time. This will reduce longer-term disruption to what is a busy location and reduce the need for future closures.”

While the work is carried out Shrewsbury BID is to transform Shoplatch into a ‘pocket park’ to encourage people to spend more time in the town centre.

The park will feature artificial turf and flowers, with deck chairs, live music and activities replacing the vehicles which usually use the road.

High Street will be closed to through traffic for the duration of the work, meaning inbound Wyle Cop, High Street and Shoplatch will be free from traffic. Access will still be available for deliveries and emergency vehicles.

There will changes to the Park & Ride (P&R) and some town centre bus services during the works.

  • Harlescott P&R service will not serve stops at High Street, Shoplatch, Barker Street and Chester Street.
  • Oxon P&R will not serve stops at High Street, Shoplatch, Barker Street and Frankwell (return).
  • Meole Brace P&R will not serve stops at High Street and Shoplatch.

Other buses serving the town centre will follow the official diversions and collect/drop off passengers within the town centre where they can.

If anyone has any enquiries about this work they should contact Cadent’s customer services team 0161 703 1000.

To find out more about how Cadent replaces gas mains and how that affects residents and businesses go to www.bettergaspipes.co.uk.

The post Gas mains upgrade to start on Shrewsbury’s Mardol Head on 20 May 2019 appeared first on Shropshire Council Newsroom.

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